NEW - Neuro symptoms getting on your nerves? Try our canine neurological panel - 6 neurological pathogens from 1 CSF sample; or our feline neurological panel - 5 neurological pathogens from 1 CSF sample.

Oh baby! Try our canine breeding PCR panel - 3 canine sexually transmitted diseases tested from swabs or semen samples.

Respiratory symptoms got you breathless? Try our canine respiratory PCR panel - we test for 6 canine respiratory pathogens from throat, nasal and eye swabs.

...or maybe you need our feline respiratory PCR panel -- 6 feline respiratory pathogens from throat, nasal and eye swabs.

Diarrhea got you on the run? Try our canine diarrhea PCR panel -- 8 major diarrheagenic agents from 1 fecal specimen...
...OR our 9-pathogen feline diarrhea PCR panel.

Not feeling sanguine about bloodborne pathogens in cats? Try our feline bloodborne PCR panel -- 4 major bloodborne pathogens from 1 blood sample.

Ticks bugging you? Try our tickborne disease PCR panel -- 7 major tickborne pathogens from 1 blood sample.

Just plain sick and tired? Try our canine anemia PCR panel or our feline anemia PCR panel -- detect and differentiate multiple anemia pathogens from 1 blood sample.

            * * *           

Zoologix performs canine and feline PCR tests for...

Anaplasma phagocytophilum

Anaplasma platys

Aspergillus species

Aspergillus fumigatus

Babesia

Bartonella

Baylisascaris procyonis

Bordetella bronchiseptica

Borrelia burgdorferi

Brucella

Campylobacter

Canine adenovirus type 1

Canine adenovirus type 2

Canine enteric coronavirus (CCV1)

Canine distemper

Canine herpesvirus

Canine papillomavirus

Canine parainfluenza virus

Canine parvovirus

Canine respiratory coronavirus (CCV2)

Chagas disease

Chikungunya virus

Chlamydophila psittaci

Clostridium species

Coccidia

Cryptococcus

Cryptosporidium

Cytauxzoon felis

E. coli

Ehrlichia

Fading kitten syndrome

Feline calicivirus

Feline distemper

Feline enteric coronavirus

Feline foamy virus

Feline herpesvirus type 1

Feline immunodeficiency virus

Feline infectious anemia

Feline infectious peritonitis

Feline leukemia

Feline panleukopenia

Feline papillomavirus

Feline pneunomitis

Feline rhinotracheitis virus

Feline sarcoma virus

Feline syncytial virus

Francisella tularensis

Giardia

Group G strep

Haemobartonella canis

Haemobartonella felis

Helicobacter

Influenza

Lawsonia intracellularis

Leishmania

Leptospira

Lyme disease

MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staph aureus)

Mycoplasma canis

Mycoplasma felis

Mycoplasma haemocanis

Mycoplasma haemofelis

Neospora caninum

Pasteurella multocida

Pneumocystis carinii

Rabies

Reovirus screen

Rickettsia screen

Salmonella

Sarcocystis neurona

Streptococcus, Group G

Streptococcus pneumoniae

Streptococcus pyogenes

Streptococcus zooepidemicus

Toxoplasma gondii

Trichomonas/
Tritrichomonas

Trypanosoma cruzi

Tularemia

West Nile virus

Yersinia pestis

Yersinia pseudotuberculosis


Leptospira PCR test for dogs and cats

dog and cat assay data sheet

Leptospira

Test code:
B0051 - Ultrasensitive qualitative detection of Leptospira by real time polymerase chain reaction

B0051 is included on P0034 - canine breeding panel and on P0039 canine anemia panel

Leptospirosis is a disease of worldwide significance that infects both animals and humans. The scientific name of the infecting organism is Leptospira interrogans sensu lato. Within this species there are many different strains (serovars), eight of which are of importance for dogs and cats. These eight strains produce different levels and types of disease depending on the animals they infect.

Although cats are susceptible to infection, they rarely show signs of disease and can become carriers. The disease is a more significant problem in dogs, people, and livestock. Vaccines are available, but they are only effective for one or two of the more common strains. Current canine vaccines protect against the serovars canicola and icterohaemorrhagiae. These two serovars have been decreasing as a percentage of the total number of infections, but unfortunately other serovars that infect dogs such as grippotyphosa, pomona, and bratislava have increased.

Leptospira can be spread between animals through contact with infected urine, venereal or placental transfer, bite wounds, or the ingestion of infected tissue. Crowded living conditions, as found in kennels, can spread the infection. Indirect transmission occurs through exposure of susceptible animals to contaminated water sources, food, or even bedding. Stagnant or slow moving water provides a suitable habitat for Leptospira; this explains why disease outbreaks often increase during periods of flooding.

A high fever of 103-104, shivering and muscle tenderness are among the first signs of acute infection. Vomiting and rapid dehydration may develop subsequently. Severely infected dogs may develop hypothermia and become depressed and die before kidney or liver failure has a chance to develop.

In subacute infections, the animal usually develops a fever, anorexia, vomiting, dehydration, and increased thirst. The dog may be reluctant to move due to muscle or kidney pain. Animals with liver involvement may develop icterus. Infected dogs with kidney or liver involvement may begin to show improvement in organ function after 2 to 3 weeks or they may develop chronic renal failure.

Despite the possibility of severe infection and death, the majority of leptospiral infections in dogs are chronic or subclinical. Dogs that become chronically infected may show no outward signs, but may intermittently shed bacteria in the urine for months or years. Routine monitoring of pet dogs is thus strongly suggested.  The disease can be transmitted during breeding.  A bitch may become infected by semen from an infected dog, even through artificial insemination, so testing of stud dogs and/or their semen is especially important.

Although Leptospira infection can be diagnosed by change in antibody titers, titers may be negative during the first 10 days of critical infection. Molecular detection of PCR is rapid, highly sensitive and specific.

Utilities:

  • Help confirm the disease causing agent
  • Shorten the time required to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Leptospira infection
  • Help ensure that animal groups are free of Leptospira
  • Early prevention of spread of Leptospira between animals
  • Minimize human exposure to Leptospira
  • Safety monitoring of biological products that derive from susceptible animals

Specimen requirement: Urogenital swab, or 0.2 ml urine, or 0.1 ml fresh or frozen semen, or 0.2 ml fresh, frozen or fixed tissue.

For specimen types other than those listed here, please call to confirm specimen acceptability and shipping instructions.

For all specimen types, if there will be a delay in shipping, or during very warm weather, refrigerate specimens until shipped and ship with a cold pack unless more stringent shipping requirements are specified. Frozen specimens should be shipped so as to remain frozen in transit. See shipping instructions for more information.

Turnaround time: 2 business days       

Methodology: Qualitative real time PCR

Normal range: Nondetected

2003-2016 Zoologix, Inc. • Email Zoologix • Phone (818) 717-8880